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Police Department
3600 Kirchoff Road
Rolling Meadows, Illinois 60008
"Around the Clock Non-Emergency Service"
(847) 255-2416

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Table of Contents

  1. Does the City of Rolling Meadows allow overnight parking?
  2. How can I contest a parking ticket?
  3. Where do I pay a parking ticket? 
  4. I have been receiving harassing telephone calls. What can I do?
  5. Was my dog picked up by the Police?
  6. How can I get a copy of an incident or crash report?
  7. I need to be fingerprinted for a job application or a professional license. Will the police department do this?
  8. I received a telephone call from a person conducting a survey for the Rolling Meadows Police Department. Is it legitimate?
  9. I received a telephone call from a person soliciting money for the Rolling Meadows Police Department. It is legitimate?
  10. How do I apply for a position with the Rolling Meadows Police Department?
  11. I'm going on vacation. Will the police watch my house?
  12. Don't the police have better things to do rather than writing tickets?
  13. I have to go to court. Where is it?
  14. What do I do if I am in a traffic crash?
  15. Uh-oh. Red and blue lights are flashing in the rearview mirror. Now what do I do?
  16. How many police departments are there in Illinois?
  17. How are police officers trained and what are they taught?
  18. What are the responsibilities of a police officer?
  19. What is community-oriented policing?
  20. What happens after a crime is reported to police?
  21. When do police make an arrest?
  22. When do police fingerprint suspects?
  23. How do the police check a suspect's criminal history?
  24. Can I see my criminal record?
  25. How do I get my criminal record sealed or expunged?
  26. Crime Free Multi-Housing Program

Q #1: Does the City of Rolling Meadows allow overnight parking?

A: It is unlawful for the driver or owner of any vehicle to park a vehicle on any street between the hours of 2:00 a.m. and 6:00 a.m. Exceptions can be made by contacting the 24 hour Police Service Desk at 847-255-2416.  Written requests for night parking permission will be reviewed by sending correspondence to Deputy Chief Mark Hogan, 3600 Kirchoff Road, Rolling Meadows, IL 60008.  Mediation for night parking citations can be found at the link below or at the Police Desk during normal business hours

Parking Ticket Mediation Form

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Q #2 : How can I contest a parking ticket?

A: Parking tickets issued only for violating a handicapped parking space or for failing to display a city sticker may be contested by utilizing our mediation process.  For contesting those two violations, bring the parking ticket to our Police Department's Service Desk and ask the Desk Officer for a Mediation Form.  If you wish to print out and complete the form before coming to the Police Department, click Here.  After you complete this form and submit it, it will be reviewed by the issuing Officer who will make a decision as to the validity of your reason for the violation.  You will be notified of the decision by mail.  The cost of the ticket will not increase while your complaint is being reviewed.

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Q #3: Where do I pay a parking ticket?

A: The Rolling Meadows City Hall at 3600 Kirchoff Road. You may pay inside during normal work hours at the main desk in City Hall or you may drop off your payment in the citation/envelope at City Hall. You may also pay your ticket online.

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Q #4: I have been receiving harassing telephone calls. What can I do? 

A: Call our non-emergency number: (847) 255-2416. This type of complaint can be handled by a telephone report or mail-in report. The officer can provide  you the information you will need to contact the phone company.

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Q #5: Was my dog picked up by the Police?

A: Please call the Police Department non-emergency number:  (847) 255-2416, and they will tell you if your dog was picked up and how to retrieve your dog.
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Q #6: How can I get a copy of an incident or crash report?

A: Contact our Records Division at (847) 255-2416. For traffic crashes, click HERE for more information. In most other cases you will need to file a freedom of information request form. There is a nominal fee for copies of reports.

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Q #7: I need to be fingerprinted for a job application or a professional license. Will the police department do this? 

A: Yes. Call the Police Department at (847) 255-2416 and explain what you need and make an appointment. Please bring the print card you were given with you because we might not have the right one on hand.

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Q #8: I received a telephone call from a person conducting a survey for the Rolling Meadows Police Department. Is it legitimate? 

A: It may be. Each year, a group of police volunteers calls many residents in an effort to conduct an opinion survey of police services. This information is used by the police administration in allocating staff, developing strategies, solving community problems, and creating programs. These volunteers will never ask for personal information and participating in the survey is completely optional. REMEMBER: Never give out any personal information (social security number, bank account numbers, passwords, credit card numbers, etc.) to any person who calls.

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Q #9: I received a telephone call from a person soliciting money for the Rolling Meadows Police Department. Is it legitimate? 

A: No, the call is not legitimate: It was not from the Rolling Meadows Police Department. The Rolling Meadows Police Department does not conduct telephone solicitation campaigns and does not authorize any other organization to solicit funds.

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Q #10: How do I apply for a position with the Rolling Meadows Police Department? 

A: If you are interested in becoming a police officer, please click here.

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Q #11: I'm going on vacation. Will the police watch my house? 

A: If you live in Rolling Meadows, you may provide us with your information such as a telephone number where you may be reached, the dates you will be gone, and names of people who have a key to your house who live nearby. In case of an emergency, the Police or Fire Department then has the means to make contact with you or someone you trust to provide information or assistance. Police and service officers will not go out to your house and conduct premise checks unless there are suspicious circumstances or an emergency. Having a trusted neighbor or relative retrieve mail, maintain the grounds, and check the house is highly recommended.

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Q #12: Don't the police have better things to do rather than writing tickets? 

A: Traffic enforcement is a very important part of the law enforcement function. The number one concern that residents convey to our Police Department is for increased traffic enforcement to address such problems as stop sign violations and speeding vehicles. In addition, there is a direct correlation between the number of traffic tickets issued and the number of traffic accidents that occur. Moreover, it is not just the property damage loss we are concerned about. We know that by enforcing Illinois traffic laws we are preventing injury and loss of life. After all, if we did not enforce the traffic laws, who would?

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Q #13: I have to go to court. Where is it? 

A: If you received a ticket or were arrested in the 3rd District of Cook County, your hearing will be held at the Rolling Meadows Courthouse at 2121 Euclid Avenue. It is located at the corner of Euclid Avenue and Wilke Road, across from Arlington Park Race Track, which is a half mile east of Route 53. MAP

If you are unsure in what District your incident occurred, call the Police Department at (847) 255-2416 for assistance. 

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Q #14: What do I do if I am in a traffic crash? 

A: It depends on what kind of traffic accident youíve been involved in.

Drivable Accidents and Accidents Not Involving Personal Injury

  • Move out of the flow of traffic. If you are involved in a traffic accident and you determine that there are no personal injuries and the vehicles are drivable, please get the vehicles out of the flow of traffic. You do not want another accident involving other passing motorists.
  • Call the Police Department. This depends upon your location. If you do not know whom to call, call 911 and they will assist you.
  • Once a police officer arrives, he or she will be happy to take your traffic accident report. You will be given a case number; this is the report number. You will also be given an (SR1) accident form from the Secretary of State. You are required to fill this form out and mail it to the Secretary of State's Office if there is more than $1500.00 worth of damages on either vehicle. Mail it to the Secretary of State within the next ten days. Don't forget to make yourself a copy of the form before you send it in.
  • Don't wait to make your report; call right away. Even if a report cannot be taken at that time, it is important to notify the proper authorities. When you get home, call your insurance agent and give them the report number and any other information that your have concerning the accident.

Non Drivable Accidents or Personal Injury Accidents

  • Call 911 immediately! If you are involved in a traffic accident that is not drivable or there is personal injury, call or have someone else call 911 immediately. Be sure to give the dispatcher the location of the accident so the Police may be sent out to investigate. If there are injuries, make sure you tell the dispatcher the nature of the injuries and the Fire Department will be notified. Help will be sent.

If You're a Victim of a Hit-and-Run Accident

  • Don't chase a hit-and-run driver! If you are involved in a traffic accident and the other party involved drives off before you get the driver's name and information, do not pursue the other driver. You do not want to get into a high-speed chase and into another accident.
  • Call 911 immediately! Call 911 immediately and tell the dispatcher that the other driver left the scene. Give the best description possible of the driver, the vehicle type, color, license plate number, and direction of travel. A flash message will be given to the Police in the area over the radio telling them of the wanted driver in your hit-and-run accident. An officer will be sent to the scene to handle your accident report.

Cellular Phone Tips

Avoid unnecessary driving distractions when using your cellular telephone:

  1. Safe driving is your first priority. Always buckle up, keep your hands on the wheel and your eyes on the road.
  2. Make sure that your phone is positioned where it is easy to see and easy to reach.
    Be familiar with the operation of your phone, so that youíre comfortable using it on the road.
  3. Use a hands-free microphone while driving. Make sure your phone is dealer-installed to get the best possible sound quality.
  4. Use the speed-dialing feature to program infrequently called numbers. Then you can make a call by touching only two or three buttons. Most phones will store up to 99 numbers.
  5. When dialing manually without the speed-dialing feature, dial only when stopped. If you canít stop, or pull over, dial a few digits, and then survey traffic before completing the call. Better yet, have a passenger dial.
  6. Never take notes while driving. Pull off the road to jot something down: if itís a phone number, many mobile phones have an electronic scratchpad that allows you to key in a new number while having a conversation.
  7. Let your wireless networkís voice mail pick up your calls when itís inconvenient or unsafe to answer the cell phone. You can even use your voice mail to leave yourself reminders.
  8. Be a cellular Samaritan. Dialing 9-1-1 is a free call for cellular subscribers; use it to report crimes in progress or other potential life-threatening emergencies, traffic crashes or driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
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Q #15: Uh-oh. Red and blue lights are flashing in the rearview mirror... Now what do I do? 

A: Consider the following:

Getting pulled over by a police officer can be intimidating, frustrating, and even dangerous for the motorist and the police officer. However, remembering some simple steps will help make your traffic stop as safe and as pleasant as possible.
  • The law states that when a police or fire vehicle using emergency lights and/or sirens approaches, drivers must pull over immediately to the right curb and stop. Respond to the red and blue lights and signal your intentions to let the officer and other motorists know what you plan to do. If the roadway is clear and the officer doesn't pass you, assume that your vehicle is the one being pulled over. Once youíve stopped, roll down your window so that you may hear any verbal directions from the officer instructing you to move to another location he or she deems safer.
  • Be aware that the violation may have occurred one or two miles before the traffic stop. This delay is due to the fact that most departments have developed strict procedures for officers to follow to ensure your safety and theirs. They are required to give the location, vehicle and occupant description, and license plate to the dispatcher. The officer is also trying to locate the safest place to initiate the stop.
  • Remain in the vehicle unless the officer instructs otherwise. That is safest for you and the officer. Distracted motorists have been known to leave the roadway and strike vehicles or individuals at a traffic stop, causing injury or even death.
  • Listen to the officer and comply with instructions. Drivers often assume they are being stopped for a routine traffic matter, but the officer may be stopping you because your vehicle is similar to one just seen leaving the scene of a crime. Additionally, many people have warrants out for their arrest, are mentally unbalanced, or simply don't like police officers. Many officers have experienced verbal and physical confrontations as a result of traffic stops. Consequently, the officer may initially be acting under the assumption that you are a safety threat. Control over the situation can be accomplished by keeping yourself and your passengers in the vehicle with your hands visible.
  • Generally, the officer will need to converse with only the driver. Have your passengers remain in their seats and quiet unless the officer addresses them directly.
  • If it's a case of mistaken identity, you'll be on your way as soon as it's cleared up. If it's a traffic stop, the officer will request your driver's license, registration and insurance card. The officer may allow you to explain your actions; if so, you should speak calmly. If the officer saw you commit the violation, your statement may not be necessary.
  • If your complaint is about the validity of the citation, then it must be handled through the courts. If the contact was unprofessional, complain to the police department. Police departments have procedures for lodging complaints against officers. Departments want to know if there's a problem with an officer.
If you comply with the rationale behind an officer's actions by following these steps, a traffic stop can be a pleasant experience!
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Q #16: How many police departments are there in Illinois? 

A: There are more than 1,100 police agencies, of which more than 900 are local police departments, whose primary responsibilities are to enforce state laws and local ordinances, and to prevent and reduce crime. In addition to these local departments, there are county, state and federal law enforcement agencies that provide police service in Illinois. Together, these agencies employ about 34,000 full-time officers.

Criminal Justice Facts, April 2000, Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority (www.icjia.state.il.us

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Q #17: How are police officers trained and what are they taught? 

A: All newly hired police officers must meet certain requirements before they are certified by the state. Each must attend one of six police training academies and complete a 480-hour basic training program and a 40-hour firearms training course as well as pass both a written test and a physical fitness test. The basic training program includes training in making arrests, use of force and the rights of the accused. Officers also receive instruction in communications, crisis intervention, homeland security, crime prevention, investigation, traffic law enforcement, first aid and community policing.

Many police departments [including Rolling Meadows Police Department,] now require new officers to have a college education. Research indicates that college-educated officers perform police tasks better; are better writers and public speakers; are better able to deal with different cultures, races and lifestyles; and have fewer disciplinary problems.

Illinois State Police Academy

North East Multi-Regional Training

Chicago Police and Firefighters Training Academy

University of Illinois, Champaign/Urbana - Police Training Institute

The Suburban Law Enforcement Academy at the College of DuPage

Criminal Justice Facts, April 2000, Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority (www.icjia.state.il.us

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Q #18: What are the responsibilities of a police officer? 

A: Police officers spend only a small amount of their time arresting people who violate the law. They spend most of their time patrolling the community and responding to calls for service, which include answering alarm calls, animal control, assisting injured people, or breaking up rowdy groups. Interviewing victims and witnesses of crimes and collecting evidence at crime scenes are also duties of police officers. Agencies with  a strong community policing philosophy [such as the Rolling Meadows Police Department,] have a different range of functions, such as a greater emphasis on problem-solving activities and holding regular meetings with residents and community organizations.

Criminal Justice Facts, April 2000, Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority (www.icjia.state.il.us

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Q #19: What is community-oriented policing? 

A: Community-oriented policing was introduced in the late 1980s as an alternative to the "professional model" of policing. A philosophy rather than a strict methodology, community-oriented policing proposes that the police and the residents of a community must work together and cooperate to successfully control crime. Under community-oriented policing, police work with citizens to identify and solve crime problems, rather than simply respond to calls for service. Residents give police ideas and information about specific crimes, and also about problem areas and community issues such as abandoned buildings, poor street lighting, and drug houses. Residents and police also work with other city agencies to help improve neighborhood appearances.

Criminal Justice Facts, April 2000, Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority (www.icjia.state.il.us

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Q #20: What happens after a crime is reported to the police? 

A: When an incident is reported to law enforcement authorities in Illinois, police first investigate whether a crime actually occurred and, if so, exactly what kind of crime it was. If it is determined that a crime has been committed, the officers must then confirm that the offense took place within their jurisdiction. If not, the incident will be referred to the appropriate law enforcement agency. If the crime did occur within their jurisdiction, an officer will gather the available information from the victim and file a report. These reports are an important part of the criminal justice system. Each local agency is responsible for supplying a record of certain reported crimes within their jurisdiction to the Illinois State Police's (ISP) Uniform Crime Reporting program. ISP forwards this data to the FBI, where a record is kept of certain crimes committed through the United States. The FBI and ISP publish annual reports on crime statistics based on this information.

Criminal Justice Facts, April 2000, Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority (www.icjia.state.il.us

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Q #21: When do police make an arrest? 

A: An arrest actually occurs when a police officer indicates by word or action an intention to take a person into custody. Except under certain circumstances, police are required to have a valid warrant before making an arrest. One way to obtain a warrant is when a victim or witness goes directly to the county state's attorney's office with information about a crime, signs a complaint against the person who has allegedly committed the crime, and appears before a judge who issues an arrest warrant for the alleged offender. Another way is when a police officer files the complaint and goes before a judge to seek a warrant.

A police officer may make an arrest without a warrant if the officer witnesses a crime being committed. Police may also make an arrest without a warrant if there  is probable cause that an officer occurred and that the person who would be taken into custody committed the crime. Unless it is an emergency, however, a police officer cannot enter a person's home without a warrant to make an arrest. When a person is arrested, he or she is not necessarily charged with a crime. Some people who are arrested are taken into custody, questioned, possibly put into a lineup, and then released without being charged with an offense.

Criminal Justice Facts, April 2000, Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority (www.icjia.state.il.us

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Q #22: When do police fingerprint suspects? 

A: Most offenders, except those accused of minor and traffic offenses, are fingerprinted as part of the "booking" process. Law enforcement agencies forward those fingerprints and other information to the Illinois State Police. The state police use the fingerprints and information pertaining to the arrest to update an offender's criminal history record or start one for someone with no previous record. The reporting of the arrest triggers the creation of a new part of that person's criminal history record (or rap sheet), which will track that particular case. Today, many agencies are adopting an electronic fingerprints system called Livescan.

Criminal Justice Facts, April 2000, Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority (www.icjia.state.il.us

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Q #23: How do the police check a suspect's criminal history? 

A: Criminal history records contain information on a suspect's record of arrests and convictions. One way police access these state "rap sheets" is through the state's Law Enforcement Agencies Data System (LEADS), which is maintained by the Illinois State Police. A query to the system simultaneously checks the Interstate Identification Index, A national system that can determine whether a subject has a federal record or a record in another state. These inquiries are made on the basis of the person's reported name, race, gender, and date of birth - without positive identification of the subject. Fingerprints, which provide positive identification, are another common way to conduct criminal history checks on arrestees or suspects.

Criminal Justice Facts, April 2000, Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority (www.icjia.state.il.us

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Q #24: Can I see my criminal record? 

A: On January 1, 1991, the Uniform Conviction Information Act (UCIA) became law in Illinois. This act mandates that all criminal history record conviction information collected and maintained by the Illinois State Police, Bureau of Identification, be made available to the public pursuant to 20 ILCS 2635/1 et seq. This law permits only conviction information to be disseminated to the public. All requests for UCIA information must be submitted on a Conviction Information Request form. These forms are available from the Bureau of Identification. Each form has a unique processing control number. Consequently, copies can not be processed. All inquiries must be submitted on an original form.

Uniform Conviction Information Act, Illinois State Police
 (
http://www.isp.state.il.us/crimhistory

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Q #25: How do I get my criminal record sealed or expunged?

A: Effective January 1, 2004, people with qualifying arrests and convictions may petition the court of their sentencing county for an expungement or a sealing of their records. 

Your criminal record can cause many problems in obtaining employment, professional licensing or funding for college.

Here is your chance to start over!

When your case is expunged or sealed, it becomes off-limits to everybody except law enforcement agencies. It also means that, when you apply for a job, you don't have to disclose that you have been convicted, arrested or charged. 

If you were:

  • Arrested but never charged;
  • Charged but never prosecuted;
  • Acquitted;
  • Convicted but your conviction was reversed; or
  • Sentenced to supervision, probation or convicted of a qualifying misdemeanor;

You may have your record sealed and/or expunged.

Office of the State Appellate Defender

Click on the above link for more information!

Want to Clear Your Criminal Record?, Officer of the State Appellate Defender (http://state.il.us/defender/EXPFAQ.html

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Except where noted,  Copyright © 2005 City of Rolling Meadows, IL. All rights reserved.
Revised: November 17, 2005 .

 

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